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  • Writer's picturedcharold

PR, asymmetrical marketing, and having a good week

I had a good week in the media: last Thursday an announcement I was promoting from RED Semiconductor hit Sky News, one of the UK’s top three web news outlets. Coverage on other media soon followed.


RED, a company of fewer than 20 people, was suddenly on the same page as Eurostar and Ford. The first inquiry off the back of the story took minutes to arrive, and they have continued over the proceeding days.


When I started out in marketing, 80% of what I did was PR. I had no choice: it was nearly the only thing in the budget. Bigger competitors can probably outspend you. They might not be able to out-communicate you.


Scrabble word time: asymmetry refers to the use of unconventional and non-traditional techniques that give businesses a competitive advantage over their competitors. It involves finding unique ways to capture attention without relying on traditional advertising channels.

PR is the perfect asymmetrical marketing technique if it’s done well. PR focuses on creating positive perceptions through earned media coverage rather than paid advertisements. It leverages storytelling, strategic communication, and reputation management to shape public opinion and generate buzz around your brand or business.


Asymmetrical marketing emphasizes standing out, with compelling stories that engage readers emotionally. The best PR people excel at crafting narratives that resonate with audiences, and those stories can as easily be about mission, potential impact, or what others believe about you (third-party validation is a marketing goldmine) as about a particular business milestone.


By incorporating the right story into your marketing strategy, you can leverage asymmetrical techniques to gain a competitive advantage over larger competitors, create meaningful connections, build brand awareness, and punch above your weight.


As ever, I’m available at david@davidharold.com to discuss.

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